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OPINION: If We Refuse To Bless Others We Will Remain As We Are, Or Worse, If We Are Profiting From Unjust Gain, We Are Heaping Problems And Curses On Ourselves And Our Families – Janet Museveni

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The Bible informs us that ancient Egypt was the political and economic powerhouse of its day. The Pharaoh who was king had unrivaled influence and power over the known world. The Children of Israel who came to Egypt first as guests or refugees of famine, soon had a reversal of fortunes and became the slaves of Egypt for 400 years.

Amazingly as Providence would have it Moses, who was the son of Hebrew slaves, was adopted by Pharaoh’s sister and raised as a prince of Egypt. He received the best education in the Arts, Sciences, Architecture and Warfare. As a young person, I loved the movie adaptation of this story called, “The Ten Commandments” starring Charlton Heston as Moses and Yul Brynner as the Pharaoh Rameses.

In the film, the grandeur and splendor of ancient Egypt is captured in its architecture, science, war machinery and wealth. The only mischaracterization in the film is the casting of the Egyptians as Europeans whereas it is clear from the drawings inside the pyramids, that the original Egyptians were black Africans.

In addition, in 2 Chronicles 8:11, the Bible tells of how Solomon built a palace for his wife, the daughter of Pharaoh, yet he didn’t accord this honor to his other wives or concubines. The Bible also tells the story of the queen of Sheba or Ethiopia who visited King Solomon and gave gifts of gold, precious stones and spices. 2Chron.9:1

All these accounts show that the Africa of antiquity was not only prosperous and wealthy but more so a political and global hegemon.

The question, that I have pondered many times over the years is,”What happened to Africa?”

Africa committed the grave sin of enslaving the children of Israel for 400 years, which returned to haunt the African continent with the advent of the evil trans-Atlantic slave trade. This year 2019, marks the 400th anniversary of the first African slaves arriving in America and the ensuing exploitation of African people. This anniversary is a watershed moment in our history and a time for prayer, reflection and firm resolution as we look to the future

The strongest and brightest Africans were carried to America to serve as cheap labour to build the economies of the western hemisphere. It was African youth and strength that fuelled the Industrial revolution and once it was underway, the Europeans returned to the African continent in search of raw materials and the scramble and carving up of Africa followed. The age of colonialism meant that Africa became a spectator to global and even their own local affairs. African communities were disconnected from each other and from their land. They were forced to grow cash crops that had no linkage to the local needs of the community and only served to strengthen the disenfranchisement of local communities and tie them in dependence to Europe.

Africans were deemed unable to take care of their own affairs and thus began the culture of being told what to do for ourselves. For it is in Africa, that other people tell you what is apparently in your own best interest as though you are incapable of making that decision on your own. I am not one of those who believe that Africa’s problems are all in the past, but I do think it is important for us to understand where we went wrong in order to not repeat history.

My heart’s cry is also going out to parents who are praying for the soul of our country and the future of our children. Parents who understand that the battle we are facing will be won on our knees in prayer. It will not be won through money or donors, it can only be won by sustained and prevailing prayer.

I believe that God has been waiting for Africans to awaken from deep slumber and realize that our greatest obstacles are internal rather than external. Our weaknesses are our own petty and selfish differences. The magnifying of small differences and totally obscuring the many ties that bind us and our historical, cultural and spiritual interests. All that is sacrificed on the altar of personal ambition and ego and the thirst for unjust gain. My prayer is that in this time, Uganda will break out of that vicious cycle and choose another path, the path of doing good, to build our nation by being and doing the best.

Many times, I have felt deep frustration as I wonder what unique solutions or innovations does Africa bring to the world? Do we feel compelled to do what others have not done in order to bring to the table a perspective that is uniquely African and thus take our place among the nations.

Even in the area of agriculture, where we have a comparative advantage and could outgrow and out produce anyone in the world, even there we have not fully harnessed our natural resources and still depend on the rains to grow our crops. Our national parks and natural beauty and wildlife is God given, but have we been good stewards to use these resources to their maximum potential for the good of our communities?

I was quite challenged to learn that when China decided to modernize their economic policies to become a mixed economy, they asked their population to make a nominal contribution to raise the money for this work. Every citizen paid a nominal fee of say 1/- in order to support and start up this work and raise the capital to fund their own programs. The principle here is self-reliance and community ownership of their work and responsibilities as citizens.

The Chinese probably knew that they had few true friends who had their long-term interests for stability and development at heart. So instead of looking outward, they looked inward to their own people. They didn’t wait for “Development Partners” as we often do in Africa, rather they succeeded by building their internal capacity and studied other world systems picking what worked and discarding what didn’t work for them.

There is a story I like to share with women in the country whenever I have an opportunity to do so. I visited Bangladesh many years ago and learned of the story of how a wealthy philanthropist saw an opportunity to help women become self-reliant contributors to their society. This Bangladesh philanthropist knew the power of investing in women and made an initial contribution to a SACCO for rural women. He knew that the rural woman was one of the most marginalized and overlooked members of the society and yet they formed the foundation or bedrock of family and thus national life. So he worked hard to gain their trust and convinced them to begin to take small loans to improve their lives. These women who started out as being very intimidated and scared of taking loans knowing that they could never pay them back, soon became more confident and started prospering. The philanthropist helped the women to form large working groups and as the women borrowed more money and worked hard to pay this money back, the fruits of transformation started to show. They sent their children to school, they built decent homes for their families and their lives changed for the better.

Soon after that, the World Bank came knocking on their door, they had noticed the success of their SACCO and now wanted to invest more money with them and perhaps help them run their banks. The Bangladeshi women considered this offer, but their answer was ultimately, ”thanks but no thanks.” They responded to the officials saying when they were in dire poverty and the banks had this money all the while and never came to help them. Now that they had their own money they did not need anybody’s help!”

That story absolutely uplifts my spirit because it reinforces my belief that real transformation does not come from big International Organizations but rather from simple personal decisions made by ordinary people. Therefore, my prayer for Ugandan families, mothers and fathers, men and women who are working hard to build their families one day at a time is that God will help us to raise children who will become serious, responsible and productive citizens that seek to make a positive contribution to their society. Children who will strive to build their schools, Technical Colleges and Universities, leaving a positive legacy behind instead of strikes and riots that only destroy what has already been built. These children can only come from stable homes built on a solid foundation of prayer.

Recently I was happy to launch the work of a local charity called Hill City Foundation. This organization gives scholarships to bright and deserving students whose families are not able to meet the cost of tuition. In addition, the organization gives mentorship and seed money to young graduates to help guide them as they begin their journey into the workforce. I was so overjoyed as I launched this foundation because it was a sign to me that finally the tide is beginning to turn and Africans are maturing and understanding the barriers to our blessings. If we as Ugandans can heed the commandment to” Love your neighbor as yourself,” we will be able to be a blessing to others & God will in turn bless us.

However, if we continually refuse to bless others we will remain as we are, or worse be diminished. If we are profiting from unjust gain, then we are heaping problems and curses on ourselves and our families. Can you imagine a home that is built with embezzled government funds earmarked for establishing a community school or hospital? You have denied that community a basic need and put your personal needs above those of others. You may succeed in hiding your wrongdoing and may even be well regarded by friends and colleagues who share your mindset, but ultimately we have one Judge who sees and knows all and nothing is hidden from His sight. He is the One who blesses or withholds blessing and therefore we should not delude ourselves. We must raise our children to know they have a responsibility to their family, community and their nation.

Finally, we all need to be reminded that it is God who created Africa and Uganda for a purpose. He lovingly made everything beautiful for His children to enjoy. And I believe He has been waiting for us to choose to become the people that will work hard to develop this beautiful land for the glory of His Name and the good of His people. It is not an easy task by any means, but it is possible. The Bible says we “will live by the sweat of our brow” and that is what we are called to do as far as our country is concerned. But if we pray, He will guide us as He always has and if we are obedient to Him, He will multiply and bless the work of our hands so that poverty and insufficiency will become a thing of the past.

May God bless you!

Maama

Janet K Museveni

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Mafias Chased Us From Government, They Are Now Killing Themselves With Their Guns Over Money And Power – Mirundi…

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President Museveni’s former press secretary Joseph Tamale Mirundi has revealed that there are many signs showing that the mafias in president Museveni’s government are fighting each other over money and power.

“You know we intellectuals have information that mafias are fighting each other that is why dead bodies are now being thrown on the streets. Mafias here are very deadly and I’m telling you Uganda will end up like Somalia, they are going to kill themselves,” Mirundi, who was hosted on Pearl FM radio on Saturday said.

He noted that the mafias in Museveni’s government first fought and chased all the people who were loyal to Museveni under the guise of preventing them from stealing tax payers money. Mirundi said that by the time Museveni supporters like him, Ministry of Education Permanent Secretary Asuman Lukwago were kicked out, the mafias were working together.

Mirundi however said that their tormenters have now developed misunderstanding over money and power that’s why they are fighting each other.

The self-claimed media consultant and private investigator further revealed that the mafias in government have guns which they are using now to kill themselves, he gave an example of the gruesome murder of Joshua Nteyireho Ruhegyera and Mary Tumukunde who were gunned down on Entebbe express highway. Mirundi rubbished the arrests made by Uganda police and other security agencies over the current string of murders and kidnaps adding that the arrested suspects never committed these crimes.

By Jamil Lutakome

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I WANT HER TO VOMIT MY LAND: Mulago Hospital Doctor Drags Former Minister Maria Kiwanuka To Land Probe For Grabbing Her 9 Acres Of Land In Munyonyo…

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L-R: Nabukeera and former minister Maria Kiwanuka

The troubles befalling former finance minister who is also the general manager of Radio one, Akaboozi kubiiri Maria Rhoda Nabasirye Kiwanuka keep pilling each day.

A senior Mulago hospital doctor has now dragged her to the commission of inquiry into land matters for grabbing their 9 acres of land in Munyonyo Kampala.  Rhone Irene Lubega Nabukeera testified before the commission of inquiry into land matters that her father the late Solomon Lubega Byatike Matovu (60) bought 9 acres of land on Kyadondo Block 257 plot 5 from prince Alfred Kigaala, a son to fallen Buganda King, Sir Daudi Chwa in 1964.

“According to the agreement we found at the department of mapping and surveying in Entebbe, our father fully paid the money for the land and lodged a caveat on it to stop unscrupulous people from selling it again, unfortunately, he died before transferring the land into his names,” Nabukeera said.

She told the commission that as a family, they knew that their father left land in Munyonyo but they did not have the documentations until 2006 when a one Yusuf Mukasa, a friend to their late father brought to them the documents.

She said that they went to the registrar of land titles in the Ministry of Lands Housing and Urban Development to find out the status of their late father’s land. She narrated that at the ministry of lands, they were told that the ministry cannot locate their land because it was still in folios even though it was still caveated. They further advised them to consult Entebbe department of mapping and surveying.

She testified that at Entebbe, they carried out an investigation and found out that their land was subdivided was currently on Kyadondo Block 257 plot 5 and 433. Their findings further revealed that the land was registered in the names of Ambrose Wafumba in 1975.

Nabukeera with her lawyer before the commission

They further discovered that the land was transferred from Wafumba and registered in Alima investments Uganda limited which is owned by Maria Nabasirye Kiwana  Kiwanuka, Margate Kiwana, Nakato Mbekeka, Margate Ndibalekera and Janet Nkabidwa, the shareholders of Alima investments. She revealed that efforts to speak to the owners of Alima investments limited were futile and they decided to use legal means. However, every lawyer they approach for assistance abandoned them. Nabukeera revealed that they discovered that there was an invisible hand influencing lawyers to abandon them.

However, Nabukeera found a tough time when commissioner Dr. Rose Nakayi, a Makerere University law don tasked her to present evidence that the land in question was sold to her father.

Nakayi, basing on the documents before the commission told Nabukeera that the land was owned by King Daudi Chwa on behalf of Buganda so his son Kigaala had no powers to sell it.

In response, Nabukeera insisted that the land was given to Kigaala by Chwa so he owned the land in his personal capacity.  She further testified that even her late mother Dorothy Nasolo benefitted from that land as a daughter to king Chwa.

Former Buganda minister Robert Sebunya supported Nabukeera that the said land was owned by King Chwa in his personal capacity not a king. 

Justice Catherine Bamugemereire the chairperson of the commission promised Nabukeera that very soon, Maria Kiwanuka and others will be summoned to explain how they got the contested land.

Maria Nabasirye Kiwanuka is still battling with her husband’s son Sebuliba Kiwanuka who dragged her to the high court civil division accusing her of fraudulently changing the administration of their father’s companies including Oscar industries limited. Sebuliba asked High Court judge Musa Sekana to issue an order to have his father Mohan Kiwanuka’s mental status examined claiming that her step mother Nabasirye is using him to sign strange documents giving her powers to administer his properties.

By Jamil Lutakome

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WE DON’T WANT YOU HERE: Kayihura In More Trouble, US Stops Him Or Any Of His Family Members From Stepping On US Soil Over Nalufenya Torture House…

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The United States has issued an order stopping former Uganda Police Inspector General of Police Gen.Kale Kayihura from stepping on US soil.

A letter from the US secretary of State, states that the former police chief was involved in serious human rights abuse and corruption. 

“Specifically, the Department has credible information that Kayihura was involved in torture and/or cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, through command responsibility of the Flying Squad, a specialized unit of the Uganda Police Force that reported directly to Kayihura.  

The law also requires the Secretary of State to publicly or privately designate such officials and their immediate family members.  In addition to the public designation of Kale Kayihura, the Department is also publicly designating his spouse, Angela Umurisa Gabuka, his daughter, Tesi Uwibambe, and his son, Kale Rudahigwa,” the letter reads in part.

Kayihura was fired as Police chief by President Yoweri Museveni last year and has since faced several charges in the military court. He is currently out on bail.

******

STATEMENT IN FULL

PRESS STATEMENT

MICHAEL R. POMPEO, SECRETARY OF STATE

Public Designation, Due to Gross Violations of Human Rights, of Kale Kayihura of Uganda

The Department is publicly designating Kale Kayihura, the former Inspector General of the Uganda Police Force and its commanding officer from 2005-2018, under Section 7031(c) of the FY 2019 Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, due to his involvement in gross violations of human rights.  Specifically, the Department has credible information that Kayihura was involved in torture and/or cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, through command responsibility of the Flying Squad, a specialized unit of the Uganda Police Force that reported directly to Kayihura.  The Treasury Department is concurrently designating Kayihura pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13818, which builds upon and implements the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act.

Section 7031(c) provides that, in cases where the Secretary of State has credible information that foreign officials have been involved in significant corruption or a gross violation of human rights, those individuals and their immediate family members are ineligible for entry into the United States.  The law also requires the Secretary of State to publicly or privately designate such officials and their immediate family members.  In addition to the public designation of Kale Kayihura, the Department is also publicly designating his spouse, Angela Umurisa Gabuka, his daughter, Tesi Uwibambe, and his son, Kale Rudahigwa.

In Executive Order 13818, the President declared a national emergency with respect to serious human rights abuses and corruption globally, which constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States.  Through this E.O., the President has authorized the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of State to impose economic sanctions and visa restrictions, respectively, on persons determined, among other things, to be responsible for or complicit in, or to have directly or indirectly engaged in, serious human rights abuse or corruption.

These actions against Kale Kayihura underscore our concern with human rights violations and abuses in Uganda, as well as our support for accountability for those who engage in such violations and abuses.  We call on the Ugandan government to respect human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the freedoms of expression and peaceful assembly.

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